• Zinpea

    Zinpea features art, photography, travelers, creatives and cool projects of interesting people

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  • Zinpea

    Zinpea features art, photography, travelers, creatives and cool projects of interesting people

    Read More
  • Zinpea

    Zinpea features art, photography, travelers, creatives and cool projects of interesting people

    Read More

How to Get More Leads For Your Dock Construction Business

Dock construction is a competitive industry, with plenty of qualified companies vying for the same contracts. That's why excellent marketing is a prerequisite for success. Unless you're getting tons of qualified leads on a regular business, your company is likely losing out to those with the right marketing touch.


Get More Organic Traffic With Effective SEO

By now, you've probably heard about how website traffic is valuable for any dock construction business. Qualified visitors to your site can put in requests for estimates or dial you up directly for more information.

Companies like Decks & Docks are prime examples of building websites that work perfectly for lead generation. Visitors to their site can navigate quickly to get in contact with a dock construction company.

Decks & Docks is a firm that does lead generation for companies in Florida and nearby areas. They route customers to the best vendor for dock material or decking services. A similar approach will work for any business in the industry. As long as the proper emphasis on SEO is there from the beginning, a website is a foundational marketing asset that brings in new people.

Consistent Social Media Marketing Wins Deals

Another way to attract new clients for docks is with a consistent social media marketing campaign. It's not enough to post a few times and then quit. Your audience expects to hear from you a lot. The dock builders who invest in managing their social profiles reap the rewards.

Consistency is such a big deal because it separates one account from another over time. Anyone can do a few posts and spend a few minutes online, but it takes dedication to build an audience and engage. At times it may seem frustrating, but that's when it's worth remembering that social media traffic is valuable! All online visitors have a value, and the more of them that visit your business website, the better it is for revenues.

Build up a Solid Review Base

Customers who are looking for new vendors want to know what that firm's existing clients think. That's the primary reason that reviews are such a big deal online. They show a consensus opinion that helps prospects decide on using a service or not. Construction businesses won't necessarily get a ton of reviews, so it's worth cultivating a relationship with customers and asking them to add their two cents online. Not everyone wants to, but a percentage of your happiest clients will be glad to do it.
There's no reason to do the work yourself since low-costs apps exist that make collecting and responding to reviews easy. If you plan on getting money from your website or at least using it to service customers, reviews are a smart cornerstone to build on.

Stay in Touch With Email

The best move possible is to ask customers and prospects for their email and permission to send them a newsletter. Once they decide to opt-in, you'll be able to stay in communications with them over time. Otherwise, many of these people will forget all about you and end up doing business with a competitor.

Maintaining a newsletter is not too challenging, and it's a convenient way to send offers to people. If you have industry and company news that's worth sharing, it pays to send a message to those with the highest levels of interest.

Make It Easy to Reach Your Business

Most customers searching online do so with a phone. It's savvy to make it easy for them to call you to answer quick questions. It's also worth providing live chat links and email followups. Online searchers expect fast and thorough service, especially when inquiring about a high ticket item. They also are testing the waters to see how responsive your company is when they engage.
Even if you use an answering service to handle phone calls, make sure to respond in a timely fashion. Nobody wants to wait for days to get a callback. Your website contact page should have all the pertinent information it takes for anyone to get in touch with you.

Word of Mouth Is Helpful

Developing a good reputation with customers helps get more people to try your company. Recommendations are compelling because they come from trusted sources. If you have a sales department, it's worth engaging with old clients after the sale to see if they're satisfied. If they are, it's possible to get them to come up with a few other people worth calling. Not everyone needs dock work, but people who do may travel in the same circles. Tapping into referrals is a tested and proven way to generate more leads.

Pull All out All Stops

It's worth experimenting with different methods of decking marketing to see what works best. Not all strategies work for each industry, so methodical experimentation is the preferred method to determine your leading techniques. For many, a website and social media marketing are more than enough. Others may decide they do better with email marketing and paid ads. What matters is that you find a sustainable way to bring in more revenue every day.

One thing about marketing is that it's continually evolving. That's because sometimes new ideas work better than ones that have been in use for years. You may always try to catch people's attention, whether it's online or with targeted local marketing. You may be able to gain some publicity if you're willing to host an event. There are no hard and fast rules for doing it right; that's why a bit of improvisation is worth trying.

Getting new leads is as important as doing construction and install dock material right. Without one, you won't have enough jobs to sustain a living. With lead generation strategies in place, your coffers will remain filled with likely prospects who are ready to build. That way, your enterprise will stay stable and have all the jobs necessary to continue. That's the result of any successful lead generation program.

Photoshop with IzzyBll

Having imagination is one thing but being able to imagine a new world and creative fantasies and conceptual designs, turning them into a visualized photograph is something completely on another level! We sat down with Izzy from @izzybll on instagram, and Got you some inside scoop on how this is done.


So how does one take one’s imagination and turn that into a fascinating concept? “Honestly, you just have to let your imagination run wild and not have anything holding it back, its like being an adult but still having the imagination of a 4 year old” Said Izzy. Izzy uses Adobe Photoshop and compliments his final pieces by either combining tools from one or more other software’s such as Adobe Lightroom and Cinema4D for any rendering needed. 

Izzy is better known for his realism in conceptual art where he adds fantasy into reality, Really manipulating the photograph/s in certain ways and we asked him to give us the top five tips to improve or create better manipulation and surreal visual art.


  1. Probably the most important aspect of any photo-manipulation task is getting lighting and shadows correctly as this plays one of the biggest parts in giving it that real look and blend, of course this going with colour blending as well. 
  2. Brushes are really important as well, you could do alright with the stock ones however I would really suggest downloading some advanced brushes , or create your own brushes where these could be used to add realistic textures which leads on to the third tip! 
  3. Textures! Very important to any element in an image, it can look like a duck but if it does not have the texture of a duck it just simply won’t cut it! The reason for any texture whether on the ground of the image or any element is to make it look realistic and suited to the real world item/surface/element. 
  4. Lightroom! You may be a fan, you may not be, But the fact is that after creating your piece you’ll need to modify those colours and tones to give it the feel you are aiming for, sure you can do this in photoshop too however, Lightroom has a few extra steps above photoshop when it comes to contrast , curves and in-depth elevation settings for highlights, contrasts and more tools which you can use to truly give the feeling you want to achieve when looking at your final art work. 
  5. Even when you’ve already spent hours, days or weeks on your final art work , Do not be afraid to change it! Many believe that they might ruin it by trying new things or changing something on the image, Do not b afraid to try new things as this is how you will learn new techniques and styles of editing. You may even end up with a completely different idea for your concept!

So Izzy gave us and our readers some great tips and we will be putting these to use! Bellow we will display some of the artist’s great work and we hope it will motivate you to create your own and encourage your creativity!


Follow Izzy on his journey on instagram www.instagram.com/izzybll

Joseph de la Hoyde, A Body of Desire Exhibition

The art that you present through your project A Body of Desire has such a unique style, i personally feel it grabs you through its utter beauty but keeps the eye engaged with its blends of raw & dark elements. What inspired the A Body of Desire movement?


Thank you so much! I’ve spent most of my life creating things in anyway I can. During school I did art and music, and after school I spent my time writing and performing in a rock band. After the band sort of finished up, or took a pause, I moved into film music and production which was somewhere where I felt at home, but I always had this urge to do more, keep all sides of my creative self active. Pursing music is a difficult thing, and I’d grown up with issues with anxiety and OCD so I needed a way of getting everything out. A Body of Desire first started with writing - I wrote things down, just things that I felt. When you spend so much time with your creative self I feel like you started to feed off yourself and the world suddenly isn’t enough. A Body of Desire is about that feeling - the dreams, the weight of guilt, the obsession with things - it’s about a mind, a body of people that want to be present, but can only do it in the pursuit of something else - some act of creation that sublimates all other feeling. In the end, we are all just bodies of desire, and the sooner we realise, maybe the sooner we can detach from that.


To a new viewer of A Body of Desire how would you best explain the project?

I’d probably say that A Body of Desire is a feeling - it started as an experimental art photography and poetry concept, but since then has grown to include my music and my curiosity for collecting things. We fear death, but I think there is a lot we can learn from it - like if we could look at life through the lens of death itself, everything would seem more beautiful.

How does it feel having over 20 thousand fans across your social media that connect with your art?

It feels amazing! When I started on Instagram I truly didn’t know how much of an art community existed on it. I’ve loved connecting with like-minded people, it’s amazing what that sense of connection does to inspire and motivate you. 2019 has been a busy year for you, from an online status to now having your work available in physical form, how has that process been for you? And how did it feel being a finalist in your very first exhibition at the Hornsby Art Prize? 2019 has been massive. A big part of this year I really wanted to get outside the box - Instagram has been an amazing platform for me, but in my work I feel like a lot of the impact comes from standing in front of it, reading from a book in your hands, or examining some curiosity. There is something unalienable about that force. I’ve been dying to exhibit my art and planning a solo show for most of the year, and just out of curiosity I entered one of my works ‘Melancholy’ into the Hornsby Art Prize mid year. I totally forgot I had done it and a couple of months later I got the email to say I’d been selected as a finalist and was to be exhibited in the finalist’s exhibition. For me that was a sign and sort of jump started everything in terms of my own solo show. It’s an incredible feeling being recognised for your work, but the weird thing is the hardest part seems to be letting go and just getting out there.



You are a man of many talents and we have seen that you have expressed art through many forms such as poetry, music, photography and more, when you think of A Body of Desire do you have a main focus? or does it have no boundaries?

The incredible thing about this project is that it has taught me so much about who I am. In life we are taught we have to be one thing, and at first I had an incredible amount of guilt for spending time on my art away from my music career. That guilt, for an already anxious person is hard, but eventually I realised that A Body of Desire was everything for me all in one place. I could do all the things I’d done as a kid, all the art, my love for writing and photography, music, collecting - it just seemed natural that A Body of Desire became a place where every small part of what I do made sense, so in in that way I like to think of it as boundless. There is a core feeling to what makes A Body of Desire, I think it’s like a romance in dark and transitory beauty - things that make us stop from a second and look up at the moon, or at the tide as it smashes against the coastline. I like to think of it like a movement of sorts, the stillness between breathes that makes us feel whole.

You have an exhibition coming up at the Sydney Art School in 2020, how has the process been organising the art you will showcase? And how would you describe the work you will be showcasing?

The process leading up to my first solo exhibition has actually been really cathartic. I’ve been able to bring work together that I’ve had for years together with new work, and it has been inspiring to put it all in one place and think of the best way to present it. I think that is sort of the the best part of exhibiting a body of work - it gets you thinking in way that just isn’t possible if your only concerned with creating online content. The work I will be showcasing is pretty widespread - I have a core writing and photography focus which is juxtaposed next to my collection of curiosities, things I have found in nature.


Who are some artists that have influenced you and your project A Body of Desire?

I have a heap of influences when it comes to my art, that is where the online world has been a blessing. I love renaissance and romantic art and literature painters Botticelli, writers like Emily Dickinson, composers like Chopin - then there are more contemporary writers, artists and composers, Ted Hughes, composers like Johann Johannsson, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, photographers like Haris Nukem, Shea DeTar and Remi Rebillard. There are just so many out there today doing some incredible things and the cool thing about my own art is that I get to draw from all of them, there are no boundaries.

What can we expect from you in the near future?

You can expect more shows, more art, music, writing and bigger projects with bigger scopes. I want to be doing big commissions, seeing my art in exhibitions across the world, publishing art books and doing performances.

For someone that is interested in attending your next exhibition, where can they go to see it?

My next exhibition is at the Sydney Art School, 63 Hunter St Hornsby, from the 17-19th of January, 2020. Opening night is Friday the 17th from 7pm. Hope to see you there!

More info:


Autumn colors



steps amid
the colors. . .
autumn mysteries

Mount Robson



Curved hills
covered in clouds –
The small of her back.


Mount Robson is the most prominent mountain in North America's Rocky Mountain range; it is also the highest point in the Canadian Rockies. The mountain is located entirely within Mount Robson Provincial Park of British Columbia, and is part of the Rainbow Range.

Wolf


The pack stays so strong
Through darkness and also light
it is unity

Green Park



I'm going out, 
flies, so relax, 
make love.

(Kobayashi Issa)

Autumn road


Autumn road in the forest. Photographer: Valiphotos

Interview with photographer Daniel Doyle Pleasantville

Daniel Doyle Pleasantville photographer is a skilled professional who enjoys sharing his gift with his clients. He recently left his studio in Queens, New York to return to his hometown of Pleasantville, Ohio. Daniel Doyle is a skilled practitioner of the art of photography, lending his talents to weddings, events, families, and studio work.

Daniel Doyle Pleasantville attended Ohio State University, where he majored in photography. After college, he decided to take a gap year in Europe. He traveled throughout the continent by train, enjoying the varied architectural and natural sites. When he returned from Europe, he decided to start his professional photography career in New York City.

While his career in New York was successful, Doyle found himself missing the charming atmosphere of Pleasantville, his hometown. He also wanted to connect with his family and to give back to the community which had given him so much when he was younger. His move to Pleasantville heralded a new era in his career as a photographer.


What are the most important influences on your career as a photographer?

When I was a teenager, I saved up for my first camera. I took many photos in high school and showed them to my art teacher. She suggested that I go into photography after graduation. I also worked for the school newspaper and yearbook, taking photos of groups and special events. I would say that my high school teachers had a huge influence on my career because they encouraged me to take the leap into becoming a professional photographer.

My gap year in Europe is another major influence on my career. After I graduated from Ohio State University, I decided that I wanted to spend a year taking photos of the amazing historical, cultural, and natural sites in Europe. I traveled everywhere on the train, in some cases taking a bus when trains were not available. I saw the Alps, Italy, France, England, and Germany, among other countries. When I was in Europe, I learned a lot about lighting and composition.

While I was abroad, I started a photoblog which became popular. This helped me break into professional photography when I returned to the United States.

Where is your professional focus?

I have a broad skillset and I try not to limit myself to restricted focus areas. My photography studio offers studio, portrait, family, wedding, and event photography, along with videography. I am self-taught when it comes to videography, but my clients enjoy my work. I truly love helping people make special memories and preserving a special day for posterity.

I have recently added high school senior photos to my resume. I help young students express themselves and their interests through portraiture. My fashion photography background really helps me in this case.


Why did you leave New York for Pleasantville?

Pleasantville is my hometown and I have been missing it for several years. When I was younger, I wanted to get as far away from home as possible, but as I’ve gone along, I have been more interested in exploring my family connections and heritage. I made a number of good friends in New York, but I always felt like an outsider. In Pleasantville, everyone knows me and my family. It has made it much easier for me to get work in the local area.

There is truly something to be said for returning to your roots. I enjoyed the fast pace of New York City life, but I was ready to step back into a more relaxing life. I have had a lot of fun spending more time with my parents, siblings, and cousins.

What are some of your favorite photography tools?

Adobe Lightroom is the program I use most often. It is an intuitive program and it helps me edit and compile my works. I also use a tablet and stylus to help with some fine-line photo edits. My favorite thing to do with Lightroom is to explore a photography subject from every angle.

As far as cameras go, my favorite is my Nikon D5. It is an amazing camera with many special features that make it perfect for my work. Of course, I have a large collection of lenses and other photography equipment to make my job easier.

What advice would you give to young people who want to work in creative professions?

First, don’t let anyone talk you out of your dreams. You do need a solid business plan to make money, but beyond that, you need to explore your own interests. Don’t let anyone bully you into going into a field that you aren’t passionate about. You will always regret not having explored your creative side.